Monthly Archives: March 2015

Understanding the importance of the matrimonial home in divorce

If you’re going through a contentious divorce, and if the amount of time you spend with your children and your right to keep certain items of matrimonial property are in question, then the whole ordeal is undoubtedly taking an emotional toll. You need someone on your side who can protect your legal interests so that you can focus your energies on getting through this difficult…

No one wants to take a divorce to court, but doing so can give you leverage

Separated spouses understandably want to get through the divorce process as quickly and efficiently as possible. Even if very difficult decisions have to be made, the parties try to address their differences so that the emotional and financial strain, which is already heavy, is kept at a minimum. The spouses just want to move on with their lives and put the marriage behind them. This…

When can the support amount be higher than the one shown on Ontario’s Child Support Table?

For each province and territory in Canada, the federal Child Support Guidelines provide a Child Support Table, which indicates a base amount of support to be paid. Each province’s Child Support Table is different, though the payment amount is based on the payor parent’s gross income and the number of children to be supported. In many cases, the Table determines an appropriate amount of support….

What are the spousal support rules for common-law spouses?

If you are in or have recently ended a common-law relationship in Ontario, then it is important to understand that the property division rules that apply to married couples do not apply to common-law spouses. In general, the property purchased by one common-law spouse belongs to that spouse alone, and unlike legally married couples, common-law couples do not share in the increase in value of…

Property division concerns for divorcing boomers in Ontario

You may have seen the reports in recent years: the rate of divorce among baby boomers has risen significantly and appears to be still on the rise. According to Statistics Canada, in the 30 years leading up to 2011, the percentage of separated or divorced seniors who were 65 or older rose from 4 per cent to 12 per cent. However, for many boomers, the…

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